Chelsea Clocks 8 1/2" Nickel Plated Time Only Boston Clock, Circa late 1800's

# VR107

Chelsea Clocks 8 1/2" Nickel Plated Time Only Boston Clock, Circa late 1800's

Chelsea Clocks 8 1/2" Nickel Plated Time Only Boston Clock, Circa late 1800's

# VR107

This rare clock (1 of only 3 known to currently exist in this size) was produced by Chelsea Clock’s early predecessor, Boston Clock Company which operated from 1884-1894. Originally named the "Locomotive " for its use in trains in the late 1800’s. The clock’s low serial number indicates it was likely made in the company’s early years. The solid brass, nickel-plated case features an 8 1/2 " dial with engraved Roman numerals and a push button releasing hinged bezel. The dial, moon hands and case have been untouched and retain their original finish. A seven (7) jeweled movement is die-stamped on the front plate with Boston Clock Company, the patent date, December 1, 1884, and serial number, A1169. Optional custom fitted wall plaques available.

Product Details

Name 8 1/2" Nickel Plated Time Only Boston Clock, Circa late 1800's
Stock Number VR107
Department Timepieces
Type Clock

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Toodie's Fine Jewelry Chelsea Clocks
Chelsea Clocks

SINCE1897... The finest clocks in America A Chelsea Clock is an exquisite time machine; each one an individual work of art, made by an elite group of master clock makers with the same relentless precision and craft for over 100 years. Since the turn of the 19th century, Chelsea Clock has been deeply rooted in a tradition of keeping time at sea. Our nautical clocks have sailed the seas with the U.S. military and graced the ocean’s most impressive yachts. Chelsea celebrates a proud history of firsts. Like our military-style Navy deck clocks, first made in the 1940s to withstand the rigors of battle and life at sea. Our Patriot Deck Collection continues to reflect this innovative thinking and craftsmanship. 1969 – President Johnson watches an Apollo spaceflight from the White House, with his U.S. Navy Chelsea Pilot House Clock resting on his television.